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Help protect the Tribal Gaming compacts in Arizona



Commercial Fantasy Sports Are a
Bad Bet for Arizona.

 

Allowing commercial Fantasy Sports sites to accept bets in Arizona would:

  • Break the gaming compacts with Tribes
  • Cost the state over $100 million a year in shared revenues from Tribal Gaming
  • Trigger the poison pill and immediately expand gaming statewide
Visit ProtectOurCompacts.org to learn more and take action
 

Some Arizona legislators want to break yet another promise to Tribes by allowing out-of-state companies to accept daily Fantasy Sports bets online. While your local Fantasy Sports leagues with friends and family are perfectly legal in Arizona; expanding to for profit betting would disrupt the Tribal Gaming compacts.

Even more, the bill being shopped around the Arizona Legislature risks ending over $100 million dollars in annual shared revenues from Tribal Gaming that are dedicated to education, trauma care, tourism and wildlife conservation. 

While THOSE REVENUES WOULD DISAPPEAR, out-of-state Fantasy Sports companies would NOT be obligated to contribute ANY revenues back to the state in return for this form of gambling in Arizona.

All of this is lost in exchange for the commercial fantasy sports industry to operate here with no oversight, no safeguards for players or plan to prevent underage gambling.

This is obviously a bad bet for Arizona. 

Help us stop it. Visit ProtectOurCompacts.org
and tell your Legislator not to take this gamble with our Compacts, our Tribes and our Arizona way of life.

MAKE NO MISTAKE –
This is Gambling and Triggers the Poison Pill

Arizona has taken “a strong stance against illegal Internet gambling, which is where daily fantasy sports betting falls within this jurisdiction.”  Excerpt from Mark Brnovich, Arizona Attorney General, November 20, 2015 letter to DraftKings.

Texas Attorney General defines Fantasy Sports as gambling (excerpt from January 19, 2016 Opinion) “if a person plays in a golf tournament for an opportunity to win a prize, he or she is within the actual-contestant exclusion to the definition of betting. If instead the person does not play in that tournament but wagers on the performance of an actual contestant, he or she is gambling under Texas law.”

Wright Banks Jr., Deputy Attorney General, Georgia: “In daily fantasy sports, a participant whose purported skill level has not changed from one game to the next is just as likely to win one tournament, then lose the next tournament due to the performance of players outside of the participant’s control.”


It’s Gambling! 
John Oliver breaks down the many, many issues surrounding Commercial Fantasy Sports national attempt to legalize online gambling.

This is obviously a bad bet for Arizona. 

Help us stop it. Visit ProtectOurCompacts.org
and tell your Legislator not to take this gamble with our Compacts, our Tribes and our Arizona way of life.

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